Monday, 21 October 2013

Michaelmas daisies

The indispensable 'Little Carlow' in the foreground with S. novae-angliae 'Helen Picton' behind it, and 'Ochtendgloren'  conspicuous in the distance.
S. novi-belgii 'Melbourne Magnet' (soft mauve): 'Beechwood Charm' and 'Ochtendgloren', with salvias and a diversity of other daisies.
 The garden remains ablaze with colour, in fact it is as colourful now as at any time during the year, but the majority of it comes from composites of one sort or another, but especially the blue, purple and pinks of  Michaelmas daisies. Now reclassified, no doubt unpalatably to many, as Symphyotrichum from Aster, the English name remains constant for this very recognisable group. We are now a long way past Michaelmas and it is my impression that they are curiously late this year, but the display at this season is very welcome. Here is a selection flowering in the garden within the past few days.

'Nicholas' - a seedling from 'Little Carlow', acquired 'blind' this spring on the strength of a recommendation on a nurseryman's label. Not as good as its mother and only just escaping the hint of railway embankment that damns many.

'Ochtendgloren' is superb, great tall stems with clouds of pink flowers: here paired with the compact Salvia uliginosa 'Ballon Azul'.

An early morning pic of 'Beechwood Charm', a good rich dark pink with small flowers.

S. novae-angliae 'Rosa Sieger': the New England asters are my favourites.

A mix of Michaelmas daisies: the purple one in the foreground has slipped its label: S. novae-angliae 'Helen Picton' and 'Nicholas' behind.

3 comments:

  1. I'm like a child in a sweetshop looking at all these Michaelmas Daisies. I have made a list and hope to have more colour in the garden this time next year. Many thanks.

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  2. Nice Michaelmas daisies.I wasn't aware that they were reclassified. They are indeed very late this year, and together with Salvia uliginosa the highlight in my garden.

    By the way 'Ochtendgloren' is Dutch for daybreak/aurora. Always funny to see Dutch names appear in English ;-)

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  3. It's quite something still having such colour as we approach November, an indispensable group of plants. The new name however leaves me cold.

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