Friday, 26 July 2013

90 minutes at Wisley

The Laboratory seen from the Bowes-Lyon Rose Garden, in which the roses are cunningly concealed among masses of perennials.
A meeting took me to RHS Wisley on Tuesday, but for once I was actually able to get into the garden too - for all of an hour and a half. As it was before opening time it was very peaceful - no yummy mummies and their offspring - and I had a very pleasant if quick walk round. The garden was looking magnificent, full of colour and interest despite the hot, dry spell, with only a few areas of crispy grass. These are a few things that caught my eye and made a good picture.

Stipa gigantea and Rosa 'Goldspice' combine well in the Bowes-Lyon Rose Garden.

Attractive, innovative bedding near the entrance: Lagurus ovatus dominates the centre of the bed, with a Verbena.

Sempervivum with Deschampsia behind.

Allium heads with Nassella tenuissima

There were some striking clumps of the South African Mentha longifolia at the foot of the rock garden, attracting many butterflies: I've never seen such a floriferous mint.

Lilium lankongense

Waving masses of sweet peas in the trial on the Portsmouth Field, scenting the air around.

The current Phlox trial, after a slow start, has come good at last and is showing off an incredible diversity of cultivars, mostly of P. paniculata: it is an extraordinary sight.

The impact of the trial is made more remarkable by the apparent juxtaposition, but in different rows, of violently clashing colours - but as with cymbals, clashing can sometimes be good. Phlox paniculata 'Betty Towe' in front.

For those who prefer more peaceful shades, P. paniculata 'Grey Lady'. Judging this trial for the Award of Garden Merit will not be easy, though there are no limits on the number of cultivars that can be so awarded.

2 comments:

  1. Gorgeous stem of L. lankongense and I'm envious of those sweet peas!

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  2. Ive never been able to grow poppies. This picture makes me want to try one more time! Nice Blog

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